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November 2013
25

Popular fiction is undeniably selective in what it chooses to show. It provides images of society, constructed of selected elements and aspects of real life, organized into a coherent pattern governed by a set of underlying presuppositions. It legitimizes, glamorizes, and romanticizes particular mindsets.

November 2013
13

Rincey is really the best. She’s hosting a book giveaway and in order to enter you have to show that you’ve donated to an agency to help those affected by the typhoons in the Philippines. Watch the video to find out the particulars about entering!

July 2013
17

If you aren’t aware by now because you had no Internet/television connection, J. K. Rowling has written a book under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith, called The Cuckoo’s Call. It was released in April and has been comfirmed recently as Rowling’s work. It’s been all the buzz of late and really left me wanting to discuss pseudonyms in general.

I go on to discuss pseudonyms in literature, why authors use them, where “cancer of the pseudonym” came from, and “the decline of the pseudonym.

If you aren’t aware by now because you had no Internet/television connection, J. K. Rowling has written a book under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith, called The Cuckoo’s Call. It was released in April and has been comfirmed recently as Rowling’s work. It’s been all the buzz of late and really left me wanting to discuss pseudonyms in general.

I go on to discuss pseudonyms in literature, why authors use them, where “cancer of the pseudonym” came from, and “the decline of the pseudonym.

#psuedonyms   #lit   #*   
July 2013
16

The History of Everything, Including You by Jenny Hollowell

First, there was God or gods or nothing, then synthesis, space, the expanse, explosions, implosions, particles, objects, combustion, and fusion. Out of the chaos came order. Stars were born and shone and died. Planets rolled across their galaxies on invisible ellipses and the elements combined and became.

Life evolved or was created. Cells trembled and divided and gasped and found dry land. Soon they grew legs and fins and hands and antennae and mouths and ears and wings and eyes — eyes that opened wide to take all of it in: the creeping, growing, soaring, swimming, crawling, stampeding universe. Eyes opened and closed and opened again; we called it blinking.

Above us shone a star that we called the Sun and we called the ground the Earth. So we named everything, including ourselves. We were man and woman, and when we got lonely we figured out a way to make more of us. We called it sex and most people enjoyed it.

We fell in love. We talked about God and banged stones together, made sparks and called them fire. We got warmer and the food got better.

We got married. We had some children. They cried and crawled and grew. One dissected flowers, sometimes eating the petals. Another liked to chase squirrels. We fought wars over money and honor and women. We starved ourselves. We hired prositutes. We purified our water. We compromised, decorated, and became esoteric. One of us stopped breathing and turning blue, then others. First we covered them with leaves and then we buried them in the ground. 

We remembered them. We forgot them. We aged. Our buildings kept getting taller. We hired lawyers and formed councils and left paper trails. We negotiated. We admitted. We got sick and searched for cures. We invented lipstick, vaccines, Pilates, solar panels, intervensions, table manners, firearms, window treatments, therapy, birth control, tailgating, status symbols, palimony, sportsmanship, focus groups, Zoloft, sunscreen, landscaping, Cessnas, fortune cookies, chemotherapy, convenience foods, and computers. We angered militants and our mothers.

You were born. You learned to walk and went to school and played sports and lost your virginity and got into a decent college and majored in psychology and went to rock concert and became political and got drunk and changed your major to marketing and wore turtleneck sweaters and read novels and volunteered and went to movies and developed a taste for bleu-cheese dressing. I met you through friends, and didn’t like you at first. The feeling was mutual, but we got used to each other. We had sex for the first time behind an art gallery, standing up and slightly drunk. You held my face in your hands and said that I was beautiful and you were too, all with the streetlight behind you. We went back to your place and listened to the White Album. We ordered in. We fought and made up and got good jobs and got married and bought an apartment and worked out and ate more and talked less. I got depressed. You ignored me. I was sick of you. You drank too much and got carless with money. I slept with my boss. We went into counseling and got a dog. I bought a book of sex positions and we tried to least degrading one: the Wheelbarrow. You took flight lessons and subscribed to Rolling Stone. I learned Spanish and started gardening. We had some children, who more or less disppointed us, but it might have been our fault; you were too indulgent and I was too critical. We loved them anyway. One of them died before we did, stabbed on the subway. We grieved. We moved. We adopted a cat. The world seemed uncertain. We lived beyond our means. I got judgmental and belligerent. You got confused and easily tired. You ignored me. I was sick of you. We forgave. We remembered. We made cocktails. We got tender. There was that time on the porch when you said, “Can you believe it?” This was near the end and your hands were trembling. I think you were talking about everything, including us. Did you want to say it, so that it would not be lost? It was too much for me to think about. I could not go back to the beginning. I said, “Not really”, and we watched the sun go down. A dog kept barking in the distance and you were tired, but you smiled and you said, “Hear that? It’s rough, rough,” and we laughed. You were like that.

Now your question is my project an our house is full of clues. I’m reading old letters and turning over rocks. I bury my face in your sweaters. I study a photograph, taken at the beach, the sun in our eyes and the water behind us. It’s a victory to remember the forgotten picnic basket and your striped beach blanket. It’s a victory to remember how the jellyfish stung you and you ran screaming from the water. It’s a victory to remember dressing the wound with meat tenderizer and you saying I made it better.

I will tell you this. Standing on our hill this morning, I looked at the land we chose for ourselves. I saw a few green patches and our sweet little shed. That same dog was barking. A storm was moving in. I didn’t think of heaven, but I saw the clouds were beautiful and I watched them cover the sun.

June 2013
22
Hi! I don’t think I’ve actually received this rec. It’s no problem.
I’d suggest The Perks of Being a Wallflower for Charlie, The Book Thieffor Liesel, A Song of Ice and Fire series for Tyrion, Pride and Prejudice for Elizabeth, The Shadow of the Wind for Daniel, Harry Potter series for Hermione, Fangirl for Cath, Matilda for well Matilda, Northanger Abbeyfor Catherine, Anne of Green Gables for Anne, and Inkheart for Meggie. I know I’m missing some books.
My followers suggest Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami, The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, The Infernal Devices trilogy by Cassandra Clare, Delirium by Lauren Oliver, Reading Lolita in Tehran byAzar Nafisi, Breadcrumbs by Anne Ursu, The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman, A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer, The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly, Pivot Point by Kasie West, and Smart Girls Get What They Want by Sarah Strohmeyer, I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith, and Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl, Name of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, and The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.

Hi! I don’t think I’ve actually received this rec. It’s no problem.

I’d suggest The Perks of Being a Wallflower for Charlie, The Book Thieffor Liesel, A Song of Ice and Fire series for Tyrion, Pride and Prejudice for Elizabeth, The Shadow of the Wind for Daniel, Harry Potter series for Hermione, Fangirl for Cath, Matilda for well Matilda, Northanger Abbeyfor Catherine, Anne of Green Gables for Anne, and Inkheart for Meggie. I know I’m missing some books.

My followers suggest Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami, The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, The Infernal Devices trilogy by Cassandra Clare, Delirium by Lauren Oliver, Reading Lolita in Tehran byAzar Nafisi, Breadcrumbs by Anne Ursu, The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman, A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer, The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly, Pivot Point by Kasie West, and Smart Girls Get What They Want by Sarah Strohmeyer, I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith, and Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl, Name of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, and The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.

April 2013
12

Bookshelf Solutions on Epic Reads 

This is a list of book shelves by need and cost. It’s absolutely wonderful!

#lists   #book shelves   #lit   
March 2013
17

History,” Stephen said, “is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.

 - James Joyce, Ulysses
March 2013
12

How a Book is Made 

New York Times bestselling author Lauren Oliver presents How a Book Is Made: The Spindlers. Go behind the scenes and follow the book publishing process from start to finish in a seven-video series for book lovers, students, and aspiring writers.

This is a really beautiful website. She doesn’t just talk about writing, but also the publishing of her books. I really love seeing how a book is put together like this.

January 2013
26
Via   •   Source
#books   #lit   
November 2012
08
World Book Night is one of those amazing things that exists. Every year on April 23rd in the UK, US, and Germany books are given out by the hand full to light or non-readers. The reason for it I think is best said from their website:

Reading for pleasure improves literacy, actively engaging emerging readers in their desire to read. Reading changes lives, improves employability, social interaction, enfranchisement, and can have a positive effect on mental health and happiness. Book readers are more likely to participate in positive activities such as volunteering, attending cultural events, and even physical exercise.

The books to be given away:
The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
City of Thieves, David Benioff
Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
My Antonia, Willa Cather
Girl with a Pearl Earring, Tracy Chevalier
The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros
The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho
The Language of Flowers, Vanessa Diffenbaugh
The Worst Hard Time, Timothy Egan
Bossypants, Tina Fey
Still Alice, Lisa Genova
Looking for Alaska, John Green
Playing for Pizza, John Grisham
Mudbound, Hillary Jordan
The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster
Moneyball, Michael Lewis
The Tender Bar, J.R. Moehringer
Devil in a Blue Dress, Walter Mosley
Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life, James Patterson
Population: 485, Michael Perry
Good Omens, Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
The Lightning Thief, Rick Riordan
Montana Sky, Nora Roberts
Look Again, Lisa Scottoline
Me Talk Pretty One Day, David Sedaris, 
The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, Alexander McCall Smith
Glaciers, Alexis M. Smith
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Mark Twain
Salvage the Bones, Jesmyn Ward
Favorite American Poems; Large Print edition, various authors
Volunteer book givers agree to the following:
You must be 16 years of age or older.
World Book Night U.S. books are not for resale.
World Book Night U.S. books are not for friends, family, or book groups.
If you’re in the US, then you can apply here.

World Book Night is one of those amazing things that exists. Every year on April 23rd in the UK, US, and Germany books are given out by the hand full to light or non-readers. The reason for it I think is best said from their website:

Reading for pleasure improves literacy, actively engaging emerging readers in their desire to read. Reading changes lives, improves employability, social interaction, enfranchisement, and can have a positive effect on mental health and happiness. Book readers are more likely to participate in positive activities such as volunteering, attending cultural events, and even physical exercise.

The books to be given away:

  • The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
  • City of Thieves, David Benioff
  • Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
  • My AntoniaWilla Cather
  • Girl with a Pearl Earring, Tracy Chevalier
  • The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros
  • The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho
  • The Language of Flowers, Vanessa Diffenbaugh
  • The Worst Hard Time, Timothy Egan
  • Bossypants, Tina Fey
  • Still Alice, Lisa Genova
  • Looking for Alaska, John Green
  • Playing for Pizza, John Grisham
  • Mudbound, Hillary Jordan
  • The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster
  • Moneyball, Michael Lewis
  • The Tender Bar, J.R. Moehringer
  • Devil in a Blue Dress, Walter Mosley
  • Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life, James Patterson
  • Population: 485, Michael Perry
  • Good Omens, Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
  • The Lightning Thief, Rick Riordan
  • Montana Sky, Nora Roberts
  • Look Again, Lisa Scottoline
  • Me Talk Pretty One Day, David Sedaris, 
  • The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, Alexander McCall Smith
  • Glaciers, Alexis M. Smith
  • A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Mark Twain
  • Salvage the Bones, Jesmyn Ward
  • Favorite American Poems; Large Print edition, various authors

Volunteer book givers agree to the following:

  • You must be 16 years of age or older.
  • World Book Night U.S. books are not for resale.
  • World Book Night U.S. books are not for friends, family, or book groups.

If you’re in the US, then you can apply here.

October 2012
27

Let me live, love, and say it well in good sentences.

 -  Sylvia Plath, whose birthday is today.
#quote   #Sylvia Plath   #lit   
October 2012
15

Voter Selected Top Ten Teen Reads 

It’s National Teen Read Week. If you’re a teen, then go out and read.

September 2012
17

the trick of finding what you didn’t lose
(existing’s tricky:but to live’s a gift)
the teachable imposture of always
arriving at the place you never left

(and i refer to thinking)rests upon
a dismal misconception;namely that
some neither ape nor angel called a man
is measured by his quote eye cute unquote.

Much better than which,every women’s who’s
(despite the ultramachinations of
some loveless infraword)a woman knows;
and certain men quite possibly may have

shall we say guessed?”
“we shall” quoth gifted she:
and play the hostest to my morethanme.

 - e. e. cummings
#poetry   #e. e. cummings   #lit   
September 2012
15

I like living. I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow; but through it all I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing.

 - Dame Agatha Christie, whose birthday is today!