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18 April 2014
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[3/10] The Waves by Virginia Woolf

"I see nothing. We may sink and settle on the waves. The sea will drum in my ears. The white petals will be darkened with sea water. They will float for a moment and then sink. Rolling over the waves will shoulder me under. Everything falls in a tremendous shower, dissolving me."

04 February 2014
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by bookslooks

by bookslooks

11 December 2013
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by books-and-illustrations

17 October 2013
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by kdstutzman

by kdstutzman

07 August 2013
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by seven8six

by seven8six

04 June 2013

Second hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack.

— Virginia Woolf
25 May 2013
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literature meme ∙ [3/6] prose writers ∙ virginia woolf
“How much better is silence; the coffee cup, the table. How much better to sit by myself like the solitary sea-bird that opens its wings on the stake. Let me sit here for ever with bare things, this coffee cup, this knife, this fork, things in themselves, myself being myself.” // “When, however, one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils, of a wise woman selling herbs, or even of a very remarkable man who had a mother, then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet, of some mute and inglorious Jane Austen, some Emily Bronte who dashed her brains out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways crazed with the torture that her gift had put her to. Indeed, I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.”

literature meme ∙ [3/6] prose writers ∙ virginia woolf

“How much better is silence; the coffee cup, the table. How much better to sit by myself like the solitary sea-bird that opens its wings on the stake. Let me sit here for ever with bare things, this coffee cup, this knife, this fork, things in themselves, myself being myself.” // “When, however, one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils, of a wise woman selling herbs, or even of a very remarkable man who had a mother, then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet, of some mute and inglorious Jane Austen, some Emily Bronte who dashed her brains out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways crazed with the torture that her gift had put her to. Indeed, I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.”

01 April 2013
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VINTAGE WOOLF

Born on this day in 1882, Virginia Woolf is one of the best loved and most admired writers of the twentieth century.

We are excited to share our latest Vintage Woolf Classics, including some previously unseen covers.

29 March 2013
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Typescripts eight and nine of Time Passes section from Virginia Woolf’s To The Lighthouse. (via violentwavesofemotion)

22 March 2013
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from To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

from To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

30 January 2013
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09 December 2012
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I am in the mood to dissolve in the sky.

— Virginia Woolf (via likeafieldmouse)
28 November 2012
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Virginia Woolf’s dedication of “Night And Day” to her sister, Vanessa Bell.

Virginia Woolf’s dedication of “Night And Day” to her sister, Vanessa Bell.

29 October 2012
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She was off like a bird, bullet, or arrow, impelled by what desire, shot by whom, at what directed, who could say?

— Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (via unfolded-proteins)
20 October 2012
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I see the mountains in the sky; the great clouds; and the moon; I have a great and astonishing sense of something there, which is “it” - it is not exactly beauty that I mean. It is that the thing is in itself enough: satisfactory, achieved. A sense of my own strangeness, walking on the earth is there too: of the infinite oddity of the human position; with the moon up there and those mountain clouds. Who am I, what am I, and so on: these questions are always floating about in me.

— Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated 27 February 1926. (via violentwavesofemotion)