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December 2011
21
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Ye Old Bookstore on Flickr.
iPads are great readers, but I will never tire of a good bookstore.

Ye Old Bookstore on Flickr.

iPads are great readers, but I will never tire of a good bookstore.

#book store   #books   #lit   
December 2011
18

It never occurred to me that our lives, until then so closely interwoven, could unravel and separate over a thing like that. But the fact was, I suppose, there were powerful tides tugging us apart by then, and it only needed something like that to finish the task. If we’d understood that back then-who knows?-maybe we’d have kept a tighter hold of one another.

 - Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go
December 2011
18
books for sale in Lacock, England
(submitted by mythoughtsdance)

books for sale in Lacock, England

(submitted by mythoughtsdance)

#books   #book sale   #lit   #submission   
December 2011
15

A Perfumer Captures the Scent of a Library

image

With his line of scents under the banner I Hate Perfume, Brosius captures certain experiences, like walking in a snowstorm. Among his favorite experiences are hours spent browsing in bookshops or getting lost in a story, so book-inspired scents were a natural step. Several of his perfumes have a literary connection, such as A Room with a View, sparked by the Forster novel. (Sniff the violet-based scent and dream of George kissing Lucy.)

With his In the Library perfume, though, Brosius evokes the books themselves, conjuring up Russian and Moroccan leather bindings, cloth, and a rare English novel. In an exclusive Q&A, he opens up about the process of making the biblio-perfume, his bookish passions, his upcoming projects – and that elusive novel.

(via bookriot)

December 2011
10

Water, is taught by thirst.
Land — by the Oceans passed.
Transport — by throe —
Peace — by its battles told —
Love, by Memorial Mold —
Birds, by the Snow.

 - Emily Dickinson
December 2011
06
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by Photo Cindy

by Photo Cindy

#Neil Gaiman   #lit   #books   
December 2011
04
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bookmania:

Photo by Jake and Megan Anderson

bookmania:

Photo by Jake and Megan Anderson

December 2011
04
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prettybooks:

(by Enchanticals)

prettybooks:

(by Enchanticals)

#books   #lit   
December 2011
02
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prettybooks:

(by Jenny Spadafora)

prettybooks:

(by Jenny Spadafora)

#books   #lit   #bookstack   
December 2011
01
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Don’t ever apologize to an author for buying something in paperback, or taking it out from a library (that’s what they’re there for. Use your library). Don’t apologize to this author for buying books second hand, or getting them from bookcrossing or borrowing a friend’s copy. What’s important to me is that people read the books and enjoy them, and that, at some point in there, the book was bought by someone. And that people who like things, tell other people. The most important thing is that people read…

 - Neil Gaiman (via bookshavepores)
#books   #neil gaiman   #quote   #lit   #library   #libraries   
November 2011
29
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There are certain books that one remembers together with the material circumstances of reading: how long it took, the time of year, the color of the cover. Often, it’s the material circumstances themselves that make you remember a book that way—but sometimes it’s the other way around.

 - Elif Batuman, The Possessed (via housingworksbookstore)
#lit   
November 2011
29
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tattoolit:

“All that glitters is not goldNot all those who wander are lost” 
My first tattoo on my right rib cage, from J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. I’ve loved the series since I saw the third film when I was 11. I recently went back and reread the trilogy, and this has always been my favorite quote. Done by Shaun at DaVinci Tattoo in Wantagh, NY.

tattoolit:

“All that glitters is not gold
Not all those who wander are lost” 

My first tattoo on my right rib cage, from J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. I’ve loved the series since I saw the third film when I was 11. I recently went back and reread the trilogy, and this has always been my favorite quote. Done by Shaun at DaVinci Tattoo in Wantagh, NY.

#lit   
November 2011
29
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vintageanchor:

Ten Wonderful, Memorable First LinesSome first lines become as famous as the literary works that they introduce. They set the mood and the tone. Those first words need to capture the reader and flow into the rest of the story. One may wonder if these were the necessary words to unleash a creative flow. On the other hand, it may be a carefully crafted welcome for the reader. In any case, the following are some first-rate, first lines… *  “Call me Ishmael”. -Herman Melville, Moby Dick*  “He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish.” —Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the sea*  “It was love at first sight.”  —Joseph Heller, Catch-22*  “The cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched out on the hills, resting.”  —Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage*  “He was an inch, perhaps two, under six feet, powerfully built, and he advanced straight at you with a slight stoop of the shoulders, head forward, and a fixed from-under stare which made you think of a charging bull.”  —Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim*  “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”  —Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina*  “This is the saddest story I have ever heard.” —Ford Maddox Ford, The Good Soldier*  “All this happened, more or less.” —Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse Five*  “It was a pleasure to burn.”—Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451*  “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.”  —George Orwell, 1984*  “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”  —Charles Dickens, Tale of Two Cities

vintageanchor:

Ten Wonderful, Memorable First Lines

Some first lines become as famous as the literary works that they introduce. They set the mood and the tone. Those first words need to capture the reader and flow into the rest of the story. One may wonder if these were the necessary words to unleash a creative flow. On the other hand, it may be a carefully crafted welcome for the reader. In any case, the following are some first-rate, first lines…
 
*  “Call me Ishmael”.
-Herman Melville, Moby Dick

*  “He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish.”
—Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the sea

*  “It was love at first sight.” 
—Joseph Heller, Catch-22

*  “The cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched out on the hills, resting.” 
—Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage

*  “He was an inch, perhaps two, under six feet, powerfully built, and he advanced straight at you with a slight stoop of the shoulders, head forward, and a fixed from-under stare which made you think of a charging bull.” 
—Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim

*  “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”  —Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

*  “This is the saddest story I have ever heard.”
—Ford Maddox Ford, The Good Soldier

*  “All this happened, more or less.”
—Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse Five

*  “It was a pleasure to burn.”
—Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

*  “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” 
—George Orwell, 1984

*  “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.” 
—Charles Dickens, Tale of Two Cities

#lit   
November 2011
21

If I but thought that my response were made
to one perhaps returning to the world,
this tongue of flame would cease to flicker.
But since, up from these depths, no one has yet
returned alive, if what I hear is true,
I answer without fear of being shamed.

 - The epigraph and it’s from Dante’s Inferno, translated.
#Dante   #Dante's Inferno   #Quote   #Lit   #Epigraphy